Reeve, Tiffany Anne - A comparison of self-efficacy between pregnant women who use cigarettes versus electronic nicotine d...

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This thesis has been submitted to the Library for purposes of graduation, but needs to be audited for technical details related to publication in order to be approved for inclusion in the Library collection.
Term: 
Fall 2016
Degree: 
M.Sc.
Degree type: 
Thesis
Department: 
Faculty of Health Sciences
Faculty: 
Health Sciences
Senior supervisor: 
Charlotte Waddell
Thesis title: 
A comparison of self-efficacy between pregnant women who use cigarettes versus electronic nicotine delivery systems: A cross-sectional study of participants in the BC Healthy Connections Project
Given Names: 
Tiffany Anne
Surname: 
Reeve
Abstract: 
Self-efficacy (SE) has been regarded the strongest cognitive determinant of cigarette use during pregnancy, but has yet to be assessed in pregnant women who use alternative modes of nicotine, including electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS). Knowing that nicotine is harmful to the fetus, more research on SE in pregnant ENDS users is warranted. Using data from the BC Healthy Connections Project, the purpose of this research was to identify differences in SE between pregnant: cigarette users; ENDS users; combination users (ENDS and cigarettes); and abstainers (no tobacco or nicotine). The relationship between SE and mode of nicotine was examined using multiple linear regression. Due to small sample sizes, ENDS and combination users were collapsed (ENDS/combination users). SE was significantly higher in ENDS/combination users compared to abstainers. No other significant group differences emerged. Results from this research can be used to tailor interventions aimed at reducing fetal exposure to nicotine.
Keywords: 
self-efficacy; e-cigarettes, electronic nicotine delivery systems; BC Healthy Connections Project; pregnancy
Total pages: 
75