Bujnowicz, Kate - A mitigation plan for salmonid spawning habitat in the Lower Seymour River, North Vancouver...

Thesis submission has been registered but the project is not yet submitted.
Term: 
Summer 2018
Degree: 
M.Sc.
Degree type: 
Project
Department: 
Ecological Restoration
Faculty: 
Environment
Senior supervisor: 
Ken Ashley
Thesis title: 
A mitigation plan for salmonid spawning habitat in the Lower Seymour River, North Vancouver
Given Names: 
Kate
Surname: 
Bujnowicz
Abstract: 
The Seymour River is a mountainous river located in North Vancouver. Over the past century, this river has been subjected to many anthropogenic activities that have cumulatively altered the natural flow and sediment regime. The Seymour Falls Dam, located in the middle of the watershed, intercepts gravel transport from the upper watershed into the lower reaches. This combined with the intense channelization within the lower 4 km of the river, which has created conditions incapable of gravel deposition and retention, has led the lower reaches to become gravel deficient. This gravel deficiency has caused the degradation of traditional spawning grounds of chum (Oncorhynchus keta), and pink salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha). This study aims to: 1) determine if there is a gravel deficiency for chum and pink salmon spawning in the lower 1.5 km reaches and, 2) provide recommended mitigative treatments of gravel addition to increase suitable spawning area, and therefore increase salmon productivity of the Seymour River. A site assessment was conducted on the lower 1.5 km of the Seymour River and included sampling of the five key parameters that define spawning habitat (i.e., water depth, velocity, dissolved oxygen, water temperature and substrate). A particular focus was given on analysing the substrate as it was expected to be deficient for spawning due to the predetermined conditions in the watershed such as the dam and the channelization. Results of the site assessment confirmed that substrate is a limiting factor for chum and pink salmon spawning in this area as the bed surface is composed of large cobbles and boulders too large for these specific species to move to dig a redd. Therefore, a mitigation plan of gravel addition is proposed to increase spawning habitat and conserve these salmon runs.
Keywords: 
Seymour River; Pacific salmon; Spawning habitat; Ecological restoration; Mitigation;
Total pages: 
111